Grizzly Peak

Elevation (feet): 5,920
Elevation (meters): 1,804
Continent: North America
Country: United States
Range/Region: Cascade Range
State: Oregon
Latitude: 42.269592
Longitude: -122.616606
Difficulty: Walk up
Best months for climbing: May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct
Nearest major airport: Medford, OR
Convenient Center: Ashland, Oregon

Thanks to Kelly Canaday for adding this peak.

Grizzly Peak is an easy 5.4 round trip trail with only 750 feet elevation gain. The peak is named after the last recorded Grizzly Bear known to be located in Southern Oregon. The first view from this trail is right at the trailhead. That view being a pretty up close look of Mount McLoughlin. The trail begins by walking through some fairly dense Grand Fir. With other trees such as Douglas Fir, Cedar and White Fir. Other views along the trail include beautiful meadows and plentiful wildflowers. The summit itself is located about 1.5 miles along the trail. You will see a sign pointing you to the summit at about 1.2 miles, follow it for about 0.3 more miles and then it will be located about 100 feet off to your right. The summit does not have a view but if you continue along the loop trail you will be blessed with views of the city of Ashland, Emigrant Lake, Pilot Rock and Mount Shasta. Another point of interest is the remains of a wildfire (Antelope Fire) that burned through the area in 2002, although that only affected a small portion of this loop trail.

Directions: Following Interstate 5 South take a right onto exit 14, from there turn left onto Highway 66 about 3/4 of a mile and then turn left again onto Dead Indian Memorial Highway for just under 7 miles. Turn left onto Shale City Road for 3 miles and then left onto a gravel road with the Numbers/Letters - 38-2E-9.2 (Update: Some bozo shot up the sign so you can no longer read all of it. It now reads something like 8-2E- with part of the sign blown off). In just under a mile the road will fork, continue to go straight on the left fork (it should be marked with a sign that says

Thanks to Kelly Canaday for this description.