Petes Point

Details

Elevation (feet): 9,675
Elevation (meters): 2,949
Continent: North America
Country: United States
Range/Region: Columbia Plateau
State: Oregon
Latitude: 45.18905
Longitude: -117.22045
Difficulty: Walk up
Best months for climbing: Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep
Nearest major airport: Boise, ID
Convenient Center: LaGrande, OR

Thanks to Kelly Canaday for adding this peak.

Description

Petes Point is located in the Wallowa Mountains in northeastern Oregon. It is 9,675 feet tall making it the fifth highest mountain in the Wallowa Range.

From Joseph, head south into Wallowa State Park. Keep to the left (straight) just beyond the lake and continue through the tourist trap developments to the end of the road. The trailhead starts next to the information board and soon splits into the East Fork trail 1804 (straight) and West Fork trail 1820 (right). Follow the East Fork trail as if going to Aneroid Lake. Avoid turns to the left that provide access to the city water supply. The signs are worn and old, but tell the correct way to go.

Aneroid Lake is 6 miles in and provides tremendous views of the north wall of Pete’s Point and Bonneville Mountain. Some camping is available on the east shore, but be sure to respect the private property in the area. A mile south of Aneroid Lake, trail 1802 comes in from the east (left). Keep right on trail 1804 for a long mile to the Tenderfoot Pass vicinity. The two ridges of the mountain that form the arms of the horseshoe are obvious rising to the west of the flats before the pass.

Petes Point can also be accessed from the Tenderfoot Trailhead in the Sheep Creek drainage. This is found at the end of Forest Service Road 100, approximately 3 miles west of the Hells Canyon Scenic Byway. From this trailhead take the 1819 trail 6.1 miles to the junction of trail 1814. Take 1814 northwest for 1.5 miles to Tenderfoot Pass. Or 1.1 miles from the Tenderfoot Trailhead, take the 1802 trail through the Bonny Lakes basin for 5.5 miles until it meets up with the 1804, 1 mile south of Aneroid Lake.

Thanks to Kelly Canaday for this description.